InSight Lander on Mars
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
InSight Lander on Mars
ESP_058005_1845  Science Theme: Future Exploration/Landing Sites
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This is a HiRISE image of the NASA InSight lander, plus other pieces of hardware on Mars after its successful landing on 26 November 2018.

It looks like the heat shield (upper right) has its dark outside facing down, since it is so bright (saturated, probably a specular reflection). The lander (middle) disturbed dust over a fair distance and has darkened the surface, as seen previously at the Phoenix and Curiosity landing sites. The bright spot associated with the lander is probably another specular reflection, and there are two smaller bluish extensions that are the solar arrays, plus their shadows.

The backshell attached to the parachute (lower left) may have yet another specular reflection; the streak extending to the south well beyond the parachute is probably a pre-existing dust devil track. The lander is about 6 meters wide when the solar arrays are fully deployed.

Hardware Cutouts at Full Resolution
InSight
Parachute and backshell
Heat shield

Written by: Alfred McEwen  (13 December 2018)
 
Acquisition date
11 December 2018

Local Mars time
14:02

Latitude (centered)
4.495°

Longitude (East)
135.623°

Spacecraft altitude
271.5 km (168.7 miles)

Original image scale range
27.9 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~84 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle
13.7°

Phase angle
51.0°

Solar incidence angle
39°, with the Sun about 51° above the horizon

Solar longitude
304.3°, Northern Winter

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  323.9°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (1111MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (642MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (606MB)
non-map           (560MB)

IRB color
map projected  (280MB)
non-map           (620MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (368MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (352MB)

RGB color
non map           (537MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.