Banded Terrain in Hellas Planitia
NASA/JPL/UArizona
Banded Terrain in Hellas Planitia
ESP_068559_1405  Science Theme: Geologic Contacts/Stratigraphy
This image shows a portion of an enigmatic formation called banded terrain, which is only observed in the northwest of the Hellas basin. This basin was formed by a giant impact around 4 billion years ago. It is the deepest impact basin on the planet, and banded terrain is in the deepest part of the basin (at elevations around 7 kilometers).

This terrain is characterized by smooth bands of material separated by ridges or troughs, with circular and lobe shapes that are typically several kilometers long and a few hundred meters wide. A closeup shows banded terrain deforming around a mesa (bottom) and the transition of smooth banded terrain into surrounding rough terrain (top).

Other banded terrain appears to have undergone deformation, like by a glacier, though it is not quite like terrestrial landforms. There are several ideas for what it could be, including a thin, flowing, ice-rich layer or sediment that was deformed beneath a former ice sheet.

Written by: Claire Cook (narration: Tre Gibbs)  (18 November 2021)
 
Acquisition date
12 March 2021

Local Mars time
15:11

Latitude (centered)
-38.981°

Longitude (East)
55.959°

Spacecraft altitude
255.3 km (158.7 miles)

Original image scale range
51.1 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects ~153 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
50 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle
1.3°

Phase angle
62.8°

Solar incidence angle
64°, with the Sun about 26° above the horizon

Solar longitude
16.1°, Northern Spring

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  41.2°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (319MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (153MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (131MB)
non-map           (198MB)

IRB color
map projected  (60MB)
non-map           (201MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (362MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (340MB)

RGB color
non map           (197MB)
BONUS
4K (TIFF)
8K (TIFF)
10K (TIFF)

BONUS (MP4)
HiClip mini HD

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.