Inverted Meandering Rivers at a Possible Future Mars Landing Site
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Inverted Meandering Rivers at a Possible Future Mars Landing Site
ESP_021728_1740  Science Theme: 
twitter  •  tumblr

HICLIP
1080p (MP4)
Audio (MP3)

WALLPAPER
800
1024
1152
1280
1440
1600
1920
2048
2560
2880
4K

HIFLYER
PDF (11 x 17)

HISLIDES
PowerPoint
Keynote
PDF

This image contains interesting examples of crosscutting, sinuous and straight ridges. The ridge in the lower left of the image (orange) has gradual bends and well-defined positive relief, while the ridge in the upper right (blue) exhibits a degree of high sinuosity. Both ridges may be ancient river deposits.

In the southern part of the image, there are also possible cut bank and point bar deposition scars (green), but these do not possess visible positive relief. Although lacking relief, the sinuosity of these scars implies an ancient, mature, and low-gradient meandering river. The upper right ridge exhibits a sinuous geometry with positive relief reminiscent of a mature meandering river. Cementation of by underground fluids may have given the river deposits a higher resistance to erosion compared to the surrounding flood plain. Subsequent weathering removed the deposits in the flood plain, leaving behind the river channel positive relief.

Offsets of the lower left ridge along possible fault scarps (red) suggest that the area was cut by faults either during or after deposition of the river deposits. There also appears to be a less pronounced fault at the terminus of the upper right ridge.

Written by: Hayden Smith and Marjorie A. Chan  (25 November 2015)
 
Acquisition date
16 March 2011

Local Mars time
15:02

Latitude (centered)
-5.716°

Longitude (East)
153.505°

Spacecraft altitude
268.3 km (166.8 miles)

Original image scale range
from 26.9 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) to 53.7 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning)

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle
1.2°

Phase angle
46.5°

Solar incidence angle
48°, with the Sun about 42° above the horizon

Solar longitude
255.6°, Northern Autumn

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  337.1°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (477MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (219MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (219MB)
non-map           (218MB)

IRB color
map projected  (67MB)
non-map           (248MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (132MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (126MB)

RGB color
non map           (241MB)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.