A New Impact Site in the Southern Middle Latitudes
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
A New Impact Site in the Southern Middle Latitudes
ESP_049061_1370  Science Theme: Impact Processes


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Over 500 new impact events have been detected from before-and-after images, mostly from MRO’s Context Camera, with a HiRISE followup. Those new craters that expose shallow ice are of special interest, especially at latitudes where not previously detected, to better map the ice distribution.

We hope to find ice at relatively low latitudes both for understanding recent climate change and as a resource for possible future humans on Mars. This new impact, which occurred between August and December 2016 (at 42.5 degree South latitude) would provide an important constraint if ice was detected.

Alas, the HiRISE color image does not indicate that ice is exposed. There is an elongated cluster of new craters (or just dark spots where the craters are too small to resolve), due to an oblique impact in which the bolide fragmented in the Martian atmosphere.

Written by: Alfred McEwen (audio: Tre Gibbs)  (5 April 2017)
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Acquisition date
13 January 2017

Local Mars time:
14:20

Latitude (centered)
-42.571°

Longitude (East)
226.827°

Range to target site
250.8 km (156.8 miles)

Original image scale range
25.1 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~75 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle:
3.3°

Phase angle:
38.7°

Solar incidence angle
36°, with the Sun about 54° above the horizon

Solar longitude
298.4°, Northern Winter

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  29.9°
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Merged RGB
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RGB color
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map-projected   (581MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (318MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
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map-projected  (247MB)
non-map           (371MB)

IRB color
map projected  (92MB)
non-map           (307MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (148MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (142MB)

RGB color
non map           (302MB)
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
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Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

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All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.