The Coolest Landscape on Mars (or Earth)
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
The Coolest Landscape on Mars (or Earth)
ESP_047304_0930  Science Theme: Seasonal Processes


HICLIP

1080p (MP4)
720p (MP4)
Listen to the text

WALLPAPER

800  1024
1152  1280
1440  1600
1920  2048
2560  2880
4K  8K

HIFLYER

PDF, 11 x 17 in

HISLIDES

PowerPoint
Keynote
PDF
Many Martian landscapes contain features that are familiar to ones we find on Earth, like river valleys, cliffs, glaciers and volcanos.

However, Mars has an exotic side too, with landscapes that are alien to Earthlings. This image shows one of these exotic locales at the South Pole. The polar cap is made from carbon dioxide (dry ice), which does not occur naturally on the Earth. The circular pits are holes in this dry ice layer that expand by a few meters each Martian year.

New dry ice is constantly being added to this landscape by freezing directly out of the carbon dioxide atmosphere or falling as snow. Freezing out the atmosphere like this limits how cold the surface can get to the frost point at -130 degrees Celsius (-200 F). Nowhere on Mars can ever get any colder this, making this this coolest landscape on Earth and Mars combined!

Written by: Shane Byrne  (7 December 2016)

This is a stereo pair with ESP_047237_0930.
twitter  •  facebook  •  google+  •  tumblr
 
Acquisition date
29 August 2016

Local Mars time:
19:03

Latitude (centered)
-86.771°

Longitude (East)
16.333°

Range to target site
246.8 km (154.2 miles)

Original image scale range
24.7 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~74 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel

Map projection
Polarstereographic

Emission angle:
0.0°

Phase angle:
77.5°

Solar incidence angle
78°, with the Sun about 12° above the horizon

Solar longitude
212.8°, Northern Autumn

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  144°
Sub-solar azimuth:  37.8°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (567MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (337MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (296MB)
non-map           (335MB)

IRB color
map projected  (100MB)
non-map           (327MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (128MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (116MB)

RGB color
non map           (281MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.