Fans and Crater Floor Deposits Southeast of Vinogradov Crater
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Fans and Crater Floor Deposits Southeast of Vinogradov Crater
ESP_016843_1590  Science Theme: Landscape Evolution


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This white, purple, and pink surface is located on the floor of an impact crater on the southeast rim of the larger Vinogradov Crater in southern Margaritifer Terra.

The surface consists of what is left of a series of thin layers that subsequently eroded to create a “bullseye” pattern. The rough, etched appearance of the surface is similar-looking to deposits in other craters in the region and that are often associated with alluvial fans. The apparent ease and manner in which the materials are eroded relative to nearby fans and crater materials suggests they are fine-grained and the dominant agent of erosion is the wind.

Although the origin of the deposits remains speculative, their physical character and common association with alluvial fans suggests they may be the result of deposition into a shallow lake or playa enabled by water flowing off the adjacent fan surfaces.

Written by: John Grant  (14 March 2017)
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Acquisition date
28 February 2010

Local Mars time:
15:08

Latitude (centered)
-20.569°

Longitude (East)
324.067°

Range to target site
260.3 km (162.7 miles)

Original image scale range
26.0 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~78 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle:
1.7°

Phase angle:
61.0°

Solar incidence angle
62°, with the Sun about 28° above the horizon

Solar longitude
57.9°, Northern Spring

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  44.7°
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All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.